Cancer

Breast Cancer Risk Evaluation & Screening Guidelines


Saturday, October 01, 2011

One in 7 women in the United States has a risk of developing breast cancer during her lifetime.  To make this statistic more personal, the annual incidence of breast cancer in Louisiana women is 121 per 100,000 and 131 per 100,000 for women in East Baton Rouge Parish. The national incidence was 123 per 100,000.

These numbers are very concerning for those of us who are committed to fighting breast cancer. Although breast cancer awareness events and recognition is done yearly in October, breast cancer awareness needs to be a daily event for all of us. Your role in this fight starts with knowing your risk factors and having a regular breast cancer screening. Studies have shown that annual screenings have decreased the number of women who die from breast cancer by approximately 45 percent.

Today, there are more than 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. This is a direct result from increase breast cancer awareness and screening.

Average risk women
  • No symptoms
  • No history of invasive breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma in situ, or atypia
  • No family history of breast cancer in first-degree relatives (parents or siblings), or no suggestion/evidence of a hereditary syndrome
No history of mantle radiation (radiation therapy used to treat Hodgkin’s disease)
High risk women
  • Family History of breast cancer (first-degree relative)
  • Diagnosis of atypia or lobular carcinoma in situ on a breast biopsy
  • History of having been treated with mantle radiation before the age of 32

 

Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines

Average Risk Women
  • Annual clinical breast examination (CBE) beginning at age 25
  • Annual mammography beginning at age 40
  • Women should be aware of any changes in their breast by conducting monthly self breast examinations (SBE) beginning at age 20
Women with Family History (first-degree relative)
  • CBE every six months starting no later than ten years earlier than the age at which the youngest family member was diagnosed with breast cancer
  • Annual mammography starting ten years earlier than the age at which the youngest family member was diagnosed with breast cancer (but not earlier than the age 25 and no later than age 40)
  • Consider annual MRI (consult with breast specialist)
  • Women should be aware of any changes in their breast by conducting monthly SBE beginning at age 20
Women with a Diagnosis of Atypical Hyperplasia or Lobular Carcinoma
  • CBE every six months beginning at the time of diagnosis
  • Annual mammography beginning at the time of diagnosis
  • Consider annual MRI (consult with breast specialist)
  • Women should be aware of any changes in their breast by conducting monthly SBE beginning at age 20
Women with a History of Mantle Radiation
  • CBE every six months beginning no later than five years after treatment
  • Annual mammography starting eight years after radiation treatment
  • Consider annual MRI (consult with breast specialist)
  • Women should be aware of any changes in their breast by conducting monthly SBE beginning at age 20

Here at the Baton Rouge Clinic we provide the following professional breast screenings and diagnostic procedures: screening and diagnostic digital mammography, diagnostic ultrasound, and ultrasound-guided core biopsies using Mammotome. The Baton Rouge Clinic also has on staff breast care surgical oncology consultants trained to perform mastectomy, skin and nipple sparing mastectomy, breast conservation, lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy, and stereotactic biopsy.

Dr. Everett Bonner

Everett J. Bonner, MD, FACS
Specializing in Diseases of the Breast